Menu
Home Page

Science

Intent:

 

At Northwick Manor Primary School, we recognise the importance of Science in every aspect of daily life. What is important to remember is that by the time our pupils leave school, there will be jobs and careers that have not been invented yet. At Northwick, Science is fundamental to equipping children with the necessary skills that they can adapt and apply in order to fulfil their potential.

 

We have chosen to look at the specific disciplines of Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Earth Science, so that children are made aware of the breadth, depth and importance of learning in Science.

 

Our curriculum is in conjunction with the aims of the National Curriculum which provides breadth and ambition. In Science our intent is for pupils to:

 

• Develop an enthusiasm and enjoyment of scientific learning and discovery;

• Develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through purposeful, investigative activities;

• Nurture a curiosity of nature, to raise and answer scientific questions about the world around them;

• Be equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of Science, today and for the future;

• Be able to communicate their learning in a range of ways using a broad, scientific vocabulary.

 

We fulfil the National Curriculum requirements at Northwick Manor Primary School by teaching Science through the five disciplines of Scientific enquiry and investigation; foundations of Biology; foundations of Chemistry; foundations of Physics and foundations of Earth Science. We provide all pupils regardless of ethnic origin, gender, class, aptitude or disability with a broad and balanced Science curriculum

 

The National Curriculum for Science aims to ensure that all pupils:

develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics;

• develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them;

• are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.

 

The ‘big questions’ outlined below are the driving factors for Science and occur with our three curriculum drivers in mind: aspiration, ambition; opportunity and pupil power.

 

Scientific enquiry and investigation

 

Our curriculum enables pupils to get better at developing enquiry questions and conducting scientific investigations. During the primary years, children develop the skills required to apply their growing knowledge to practical investigations. They ask and refine questions, explore the substance of their questions through experimentation and investigation, becoming increasingly systematic and accurate as they do so. They record their findings, drawing on their observations to develop explanations. They learn to evaluate how they have gone about their investigation so that they can improve the validity of their work. As they progress, children study the work of selected scientists to understand the contribution to the growth of human knowledge and to the quality of human life which scientists have made, to build their knowledge of the scientific method of enquiry and to understand how scientists grapple with dilemmas as they look to find better answers to fundamental questions.

 

Foundations of Biology

 

Our curriculum enables pupils to get better at observing, describing, explaining and understanding the life processes of organisms. During the primary years, children begin to address three ‘big questions’ which are fundamental to their understanding of biology and life sciences: “What kinds of life are there?”, “How do living things survive and grow?” and “What makes life go on?” Children observe and study the diversity of living things, building their knowledge of characteristics and classification of the animal and plant kingdoms. They learn that all living things adapt to their environments and that change and diversity is a result of evolution. They observe and study the life processes in living things which are essential for survival and reproduction, and the factors which affect healthy life cycles.

 

Foundations of Chemistry

 

curriculum enables pupils to get better at observing, describing, explaining and understanding the properties of materials and how they can be changed. During the primary years, children begin to address two ‘big questions’ which are fundamental to their understanding of chemistry and the science of materials: “What are things made from?” and “How can form change?” Children investigate different materials and their properties, and how materials are selected and created to suit their purpose. They develop understanding of the action of change of temperature on how materials change and change their state. They observe and study how reversible change differs from non-reversible change.

 

Foundations of Physics

 

Our curriculum enables pupils to get better at observing, describing, explaining and understanding forces and energy. During the primary years, children begin to address three ‘big questions’ which are fundamental to their understanding of physics and the study of natural phenomena: “What makes objects move?”, “How does energy make things happen?” and “How can forces be changed and controlled?” Children observe, describe and begin to explain manifestations of fundamental laws of physics relating to forces and energy: the motion of objects, the action of magnetic force, simple electrical circuits, how light travels and behaves and how sound is created and travels.

 

Foundations of Earth science

 

Our curriculum enables pupils to get better at observing, describing, explaining and understanding the composition of the Earth and its planetary properties. During the primary years, children begin to address two ‘big questions’ which are fundamental to their understanding of Earth science: “What is the Earth made from?” and “How does the Earth’s position in the solar system dictate its climate and conditions for life?” Children investigate rocks and soils and learn about the structure of the Earth’s surface. They study the position of the Earth in the solar system, explaining the phenomena of day and night, seasonal change and the phases of the Moon.

 

 

Top